Mindspew.

showslow:

My sculptures are all constructed with recycled materials — old CDs, computer hard drives etc, so I classify my work as “sustainable art”. They’re a lot of fun to make, but they take an extremely long time to finish, so I don’t do a lot of them.

Animal Sculptures Made Of Shattered CDs by Sean Avery.

strapazzolli:

© KOPE FIGGINS.
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strapazzolli:

© KOPE FIGGINS.

zeroing:

Mads Perch

ir-iee:

Wire Bonsai by Ken To

Bonsai is a reflective art, but you could almost see yourself in the delicately wrapped copper wire that Ken uses to cnstruct his miniature bonsai sculptures, which are available to purchase at his rondei.

Artist: ebay / DeviantArt

omg yes! wanna learn how to do this😍

(Source: ianbrooks)

cundtcake:

toobaa:


The architects and artists who worked in the service of early Islam were likewise driven by the wish to create a physical backdrop which would bolster the claims of their religion. Holding that God was the source of all understanding, Islam placed particular emphasis on the divine qualities of mathematics. Muslim artisans covered the walls of houses and mosques with repeating sequences of delicate and complicated geometries, through which the infinite wisdom of God might be intimated. This ornamentation, so pleasingly intricate on a rug or a cup, was nothing less than hallucinatory when applied to an entire hall. Eyes accustomed to seeing only the practical and humdrum objects of daily life could, inside such a room, survey a world shorn of all associations with the everyday.—- Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness


The honeycomb-like niches here are called muqarnas.
#they’re thought to materialize god’s light on earth
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cundtcake:

toobaa:

The architects and artists who worked in the service of early Islam were likewise driven by the wish to create a physical backdrop which would bolster the claims of their religion. Holding that God was the source of all understanding, Islam placed particular emphasis on the divine qualities of mathematics. Muslim artisans covered the walls of houses and mosques with repeating sequences of delicate and complicated geometries, through which the infinite wisdom of God might be intimated. This ornamentation, so pleasingly intricate on a rug or a cup, was nothing less than hallucinatory when applied to an entire hall. Eyes accustomed to seeing only the practical and humdrum objects of daily life could, inside such a room, survey a world shorn of all associations with the everyday.

—- Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

The honeycomb-like niches here are called muqarnas.

#they’re thought to materialize god’s light on earth

orientaltiger:

Istanbul Turkey - Mahnoor Hussain

likeafieldmouse:

Matthew Stone - Selections from Optimism as Cultural Rebellion and Unconditional Love

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Emoji-nation by Nastya Nudnik

Sometimes, and it happens very rarely, something spectacular from our collective history clashes dramatically with a piece of nuanced pop culture. Today, one of these fantastic things came to us in the form of this collection of viral images.

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martinekenblog:

Nuria Riaza is a Spanish illustrator. She lives and works in Valencia, Spain.

Anonymous asked: You're an extremely talented artist that could represent anything. Why do you choose to depict celebrities and iconic figures? I believe your artwork could have so much more merit and can contribute much more to society then just entertainment. You even have your symbol as the golden spiral, which I find rather smug for an artist who creates "fan art". I don't intend to offend, it just greatly bothers me to see such a talented artist create advertisement and I would like to know why.

samspratt:

Oh boy.

"Smug" is arbitrarily thinking that one entire genre of art is less than another. 

"Smug" is anonymous back-handed compliments that insult an entire group of artists while trying to police what I choose to make.

"Smug" is thinking that you bestow merit to art and decide its value or contribution to society — or that it needs to do that to begin with.

"Smug" is believing that advertisements are something that automatically lessens art when some of the best painters and works throughout art history, from Leonardo to Caravaggio to Rockwell and Leyendecker have worked in advertising for clients (churches included).

"Smug" is looking at my portfolio of hundreds of paintings over 3 years that cover dozens of genres, styles, subject matters, clients, and sits everywhere from the internet, to billboards, album covers, magazine covers, galleries, newspapers, movie posters, bus-sides, books, homes of friends, strangers, and celebrities, and still choosing to think that I am one thing — a thing that is just as valuable to me as everything I’m paid for professionally.

"Smug" is being a smug dicklet and throwing in “I don’t intend to offend” to cushion the smug dickletishness of it all.

"Smug" is not seeing a simplistic connection between realism in painting and the golden rule that is genre-irrelevant, but again insulting an entire group of artists while commenting on something you haven’t bothered to understand. 

But most of all, “Smug” is thinking that I, or any artist, owes you anything. We can make whatever we want, however we want to. I will keep making advertisements, I will keep making album covers, I will keep making posters for games and movies, I will keep making all that I’m hired to do and choose to take on, but I will also keep making fan art because despite the merit or value that you’ve decided it has — I want to — and that’s all the reason I need.

Take your soggy waffle compliments and fuck the fuck off. Viva la fan art.